Security Screens vs Safety Screens

Security Screens vs Safety Screens

The Great Debate: Security Screens vs Safety Screens

When it comes to choosing screens for your doors and windows, it won’t be long before you’ll find yourself asking: security screens, or safety screens?

One common misconception among home owners (and sometimes builders and architects too) is the idea that safety screens are the same as security screens.

But security screens and safety screens are actually completely different products. And it’s important to know the differences so you can make the right decision when selecting screens for your windows and doors.

Security & Safety Screens – At a Glance

At a glance, the best way to describe safety screens is to say that they’re designed to keep the bugs out and let the breeze in. They also provide some deterrent through their diamond grilles.

Like safety screens, security screens keep the bugs out and let the breeze in. However, they’re alsospecifically designed to keep intruders out without the use of diamond grilles.

Spotting the Difference

Materials

Safety screen frames are manufactured from aluminium, as are their diamond grilles. The mesh is made from aluminium or fibreglass. Security screen frames are generally manufactured from aluminium as well. However, the mesh is made from structural alloy or marine-grade stainless steel. Both are stronger than aluminium, and meet specific Australian standards for security screens – standards that aredesigned to prevent intruders from entering.

Australian Standards

Importantly, just because a security screen is called a security screen, doesn’t mean it’s actually a security screen. Confusing? Yes. But let us explain…

For a screen to be considered a security screen, it must meet Australian Standard AS5039-2008.

Safety screens, on the other hand, are not required to conform to any standards.

Specific Standards

To meet the Australian standards, security screens must pass several tests, which are designed to test their resistance to forced entry. These tests include: Knife Shear, Impact, Pull, Anti-Jemmy, Probe and Fire Attenuation. Obviously as they don’t comply with the Australian standards, safety screens are not designed to pass these tests.